International School of Helsinki

The core element of the new identity is snowflake, symbolizing the ISH’s motto “Each one is unique.“

Identity workshop for the students of ISH

With the digital application the students of ISH created hundreds of snowflake illustrations, which were used in the new identity through the various applications.

The International School of Helsinki, founded in 1963, is an independent, co-educational, international school in Helsinki, Finland, with the student body representing more than 40 different nationalities.

The school is focused on maintaining an atmosphere where diversity is valued and viewed as a strength, where differences are seen as an asset. This focus is complemented by a commitment to international-mindedness. The IBO programmes encourage students to become active, compassionate and lifelong learners who understand that other people, with their differences, can also be right.

Commitment to the holistic development of each student while respecting individuality and diversity is symbolized by the core element of the new identity, the snowflake, and is articulated in the school motto, “Each one is unique.” The greatest strength of ISH lies in the continuing efforts to put these words and ideas into action.

The visual identity of ISH is based on the school motto and concept of snowflakes which are all unique and different, coming in a variety of sizes and shapes. To encourage the students to be involved in the identity project, Kokoro & Moi developed a digital snowflake application, which became essential part of the identity creation process. Kokoro & Moi organized the identity workshops at the school where the basics of branding and graphic design was taught to the students. With the digital application the students created hundreds of snowflake illustrations, which were used in the new identity through the various applications.

The color scheme for the new identity consisted of two complimentary colors, blue and orange, and two light accent colors. Trio Grotesk, font based on an early 20th century sans serif typeface, was a typographic choice for the new identity. In contrast to sharp edged snowflakes, the font with its round corners brought some softness to the identity.